Wisconsin cicada invasion: Where and when will you see them

Wisconsin cicada invasion: Where and when will you see them

PLAN ACCORDINGLY. JUST ABOUT EVERY 17 YEARS, THEY EMERGE BY THE MILLIONS. THEY ARE LOUD AND MENACING. WE’RE TALKING ABOUT CICADAS. NEW TONIGHT, WEATHERWATCH 12 METEOROLOGIST GINO RECCHIA SHOWS US WHICH PARTS OF WISCONSIN WILL SEE THEM SOON. I MEAN, THESE ARE ALL THE BROOD 13 PERIODICAL CICADAS THAT WE GET UP HERE IN WISCONSIN. NICK DOUGHTY IS THE MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM’S BUG GUY. HE’S TALKING ABOUT A RARE NATURAL PHENOMENON. THE RETURN OF THE CICADAS WITH AN UNMISTAKABLE CALLING CARD. WITHIN THE NEXT FEW WEEKS, WE WILL WITNESS THESE ANCIENT INSECTS TAKE OVER. EVERYONE IS EXCITED BECAUSE THIS YEAR WE HAVE TWO CICADA BROODS EMERGING AT THE SAME TIME. AND THAT ONLY HAPPENS ONCE EVERY SOMETHING LIKE 221 YEARS. ILLINOIS WILL SEE A CICADA INVASION WITH TWO BROODS AT ONCE IDENTIFIED BY SCIENTISTS AS BROOD 13 AND BROOD 19. IN WISCONSIN, BROOD 13 WILL MAKE ITSELF KNOWN MOSTLY SOUTH OF I-94 AND SOUTHERN MILWAUKEE. WAUKESHA, JEFFERSON, AND WALWORTH COUNTIES, AND JUST WHAT HAVE THE CICADAS BEEN UP TO ALL THESE YEARS? THE EXPERTS SAY THEY HAVE BEEN DEEP UNDERGROUND, FEEDING OFF TREE ROOT SAP. WHEN THEY EMERGE, THEY’LL MATE. FEMALES WILL LAY EGGS ON TREES. THE EGGS WILL HATCH, AND THEN THE IMMATURE CICADAS WILL WORK THEIR WAY DOWN THE TREE AND THEN BURROW INTO THE GROUND. WHILE THEY SEEM LIKE A NUISANCE, CICADAS ARE A SIGNIFICANT FOOD SOURCE FOR MANY PREDATORS AND THEY HELP FERTILIZE THE SOIL. IT’S THESE WEIRD BUGS COMING OUT OF THE GROUND MAKING A BUNCH OF NOISE CLOGGING UP NATURE, AND IT’S FASCINATING HOW HOW CAN THIS PHENOMENON DEVELOP IN NATURE ALL ON ITS OWN? SO WHILE THE CICADAS ARE COMING AND WE MAY SEE MORE THAN USUAL, IT’S ALL PART OF THE ECOLOGICAL CYCLE. REPORTING IN MILWAUKEE, METEOROLOGIST GINA RECCHIA, WISN 12 NEWS. NOW, NICK DOUGHTY TELLS US IT’S THE MALE CICADAS THAT CREATE THE NOISES WE HEAR. THEY USE A SPECIAL ORGAN CALLED A TYMBAL TO PRODUCE THEIR LOUD MATING CALLS. FE

Wisconsin cicada invasion: Where and when will you see them

The bug that lives underground for 95.5% of their lives and emerges for four to six weeks.

This spring, a chorus unlike any other will rise across southern Wisconsin as Brood XIII cicadas emerge from their 17-year slumber.Cicadas spend 95.5% of their lives underground, emerging for only four to six weeks as adults. You can find them around the world.What makes this year special is the rare occurrence of when Brood XIII and Brood XIX cicadas will both emerge. This is the first time in 221 years the two species will emerge at the same time. The 17-Year Emergence: What to Expect in WisconsinIn Wisconsin, we will only get the Brood XIII, which has been underground for 17 years. Southern Wisconsin, south of Interstate 94, will be most affected. They are expected to arrive within a two-to-three-week period starting the last two weeks of May. As of May 19, some cicadas have been spotted in the Chicago suburbs. Understanding the Cicada Life CycleAdult male cicadas sing mating songs and females respond by flicking their wings. Once they mate, the female lays eggs in a groove she has etched in the bark of a tree limb. Cicada nymphs hatch from the eggs, briefly feed on sap then drop from the tree to the ground and dig down. The nymphs tunnel underground looking for and feeding on plant roots. They spend 2-17 years doing this, depending on the species.Using internal clocks and thermometers, nymphs eventually emerge from the ground. On the nearest vertical surface, nymphs molt into the winged adult form. Fascinating Facts About CicadasOnly the males sing. They have sound-producing structures called tymbals on either side of the abdomen.Cicadas do no harm to humans, but do negligible damage to plants.Pesticides are not effective at controlling periodical cicadas. There are three species of 17-year cicadas. They are named Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. The species most likely to be encountered in Wisconsin is Magicicada septendecim, according to University of Wisconsin-Madison. With millions of cicadas emerging from the earth simultaneously, no predators could hope to eat them all. A mass emergence helps to ensure that some cicadas will survive. Information for this article came from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the Smithsonian Natural Museum of Natural History. If you see a cicada in southeast Wisconsin, let us know. Email webstaff@wisn.com.

This spring, a chorus unlike any other will rise across southern Wisconsin as Brood XIII cicadas emerge from their 17-year slumber.

Cicadas spend 95.5% of their lives underground, emerging for only four to six weeks as adults. You can find them around the world.

What makes this year special is the rare occurrence of when Brood XIII and Brood XIX cicadas will both emerge. This is the first time in 221 years the two species will emerge at the same time.

The 17-Year Emergence: What to Expect in Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, we will only get the Brood XIII, which has been underground for 17 years.

Southern Wisconsin, south of Interstate 94, will be most affected.

They are expected to arrive within a two-to-three-week period starting the last two weeks of May.

As of May 19, some cicadas have been spotted in the Chicago suburbs.

Understanding the Cicada Life Cycle

Adult male cicadas sing mating songs and females respond by flicking their wings. Once they mate, the female lays eggs in a groove she has etched in the bark of a tree limb.

Cicada nymphs hatch from the eggs, briefly feed on sap then drop from the tree to the ground and dig down. The nymphs tunnel underground looking for and feeding on plant roots. They spend 2-17 years doing this, depending on the species.

Using internal clocks and thermometers, nymphs eventually emerge from the ground. On the nearest vertical surface, nymphs molt into the winged adult form.

Fascinating Facts About Cicadas

  • Only the males sing. They have sound-producing structures called tymbals on either side of the abdomen.
  • Cicadas do no harm to humans, but do negligible damage to plants.
  • Pesticides are not effective at controlling periodical cicadas.
  • There are three species of 17-year cicadas. They are named Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini and Magicicada septendecula. The species most likely to be encountered in Wisconsin is Magicicada septendecim, according to University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • With millions of cicadas emerging from the earth simultaneously, no predators could hope to eat them all. A mass emergence helps to ensure that some cicadas will survive.

Information for this article came from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the Smithsonian Natural Museum of Natural History.

If you see a cicada in southeast Wisconsin, let us know. Email webstaff@wisn.com.

Source Reference

Latest stories