Why you should open a 1-year CD this June

Why you should open a 1-year CD this June
A CD account opened this June could offer big benefits for savers.

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If you had opened a certificate of deposit (CD) account in 2020 or 2021, the returns you would have received on your deposit would have barely existed. Rates on CDs with terms ranging from six months to five years were around 1% or less at that time, making them a poor substitute to grow and protect your money. But as the economy evolved and inflation increased, the federal funds rate did as well, causing the rates on CDs to rise exponentially.

But as recent history demonstrates, it’s critical to get the timing of your CD account opening right. If you don’t, you could wind up locking away your funds for very little benefit. To that point, there’s a compelling case to be made for opening a 1-year CD this June. Below, we’ll break down three reasons why this could make sense for you now.

See how much you could earn with a top 1-year CD online today.

Why you should open a 1-year CD this June

While a 1-year CD will require you to leave your money untouched for a bit longer than you may prefer (or risk paying an early withdrawal penalty), it may be worth opening this June. Here’s why:

You’ll gain long-term protection in a volatile climate

Amid geopolitical uncertainty overseas and a contentious presidential election season in the U.S., the economy and broader rate climate are particularly unpredictable right now. Combined with cooled but stubborn inflation and interest rates at their highest point in decades, now is arguably the time to be conservative with your money by protecting it as best you can. 

A 1-year CD can help. You’ll lock in your CD with a high rate right now and that rate will remain the same through next June, at which point you can better gauge the status of the economy and wider rate climate. 

Get started with a 1-year CD here now.

You’ll potentially earn hundreds (and even thousands) of dollars

With CD rates for 1-year terms around 5% right now, you stand to earn hundreds or even thousands of dollars by opening an account with the right deposit right now. If you deposit $5,000 into a 1-year CD with a rate of 5.40% today, you’ll earn $270 by June 2025. 

And, if you felt comfortable depositing a larger amount, a $20,000 deposit at the same rate would earn you just over $1,000 in 12 months ($1,080 for a total of $21,080 upon maturity). Compared to the minimal 0.45% average being offered on regular accounts today, the advantages of opening a 1-year CD right now become even clearer.

You’ll add predictability to your finances

In an unpredictable economy, predictability is particularly valuable. And that’s exactly what you’ll get with a CD. Look to other account types for confirmation. Not only do traditional savings accounts have low rates, but those rates are variable and subject to change as the rate climate evolves. High-yield savings accounts, at the same time, have rates almost as high as the best CDs, but those rates are also variable and will rise or fall based on the Fed’s actions (or lack thereof). 

But CDs are predictable – you’ll know exactly what to expect when the CD matures. That will allow for better budgeting and an easier path toward meeting your financial goals, both of which are hard to come by with other financial products right now. 

The bottom line

June 2024 is not June 2020 or June 2021. No matter which CD term you choose or the amount you deposit, these accounts are generally favorable for savers right now. That said, it can be particularly advantageous to open a 1-year CD this June. By doing so you’ll gain long-term protection in an unpredictable climate, you’ll have the ability to earn hundreds or even thousands of dollars in interest and you’ll tack on some predictability to your finances. Just make sure that you deposit an amount that you’re comfortable parting with for the next 12 months or you could risk having to pay a substantial early withdrawal penalty to regain access.

Have more questions? Learn more about your CD options here

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